Greater Baltimore Community Housing Resource Board, Inc. (GBCHRB) January-February, 2001 / Vol. 7, No. 1

FAIR HOUSING NEWS

A newsletter about fair housing, community development, and neighborhood quality of life


GREETINGS!

For a free copy of any article mentioned here or if you know of someone who should be mailed their own copy of Fair Housing News, call the GBCHRB: 410-453-9500 / 800-895-6302 or email us at mail@gbchrb.org. Check out our Internet web site - http://www.gbchrb.org.



IN THE NEWS





New U. S. Postage Stamp Will Celebrate Civil Rights Leader Roy Wilkins. In late January, 2001, the Post Office will mark Wilkins' birth centennial by releasing the 24th stamp in the "Black Heritage" series. Previous stamps include Patricia Roberts Harris, Malcolm X, , and the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (Baltimore Sun, November 19, 2000:6A)

MCIL Receives Social Security Contract to Provide Benefit Planning Outreach & Assistance. People with disabilities in central Maryland will get help in coordinating their benefits so that they may ultimately go to work. More info: 410-444-1400.

February 6th is Human Rights Day in Annapolis. Governor's Reception Room, State House, 2nd Floor, Annapolis. Show your support for human rights in Maryland! Co-Sponsored by The Coalition Opposed to Violence & Extremism (COVE) and The Maryland Human Rights Network. RSVP: COVE, 410-313-6430.


FAIR HOUSING RESOURCES



The NIMBY Report, an excellent newsletter on the struggle for inclusive community, is now being published by the National Low Income Housing Coalition. Join the Coalition online at http://www.nlihc.org. Membership also includes Shelterforce magazine, action bulletins, telephone resources, and the group's weekly e-mail newsletter on housing issues.

What Are Your Fair Housing Rights? The GBCHRB's website www.gbchrb.org has the laws, practical guidelines, and info about our TV and radio shows, programs, and studies.

TV Worth Watching!?! Local! Community, Improvements, Housing, Neighborhoods, Living, People, Rights! The GBCHRB's Neighborhood Beat is on Seven Cable-TV Stations. The 30-minute interview show runs on Channels 21 and 5 in Baltimore City, 99 in Anne Arundel County, 72 in Baltimore County, 3 in Carroll, 3 & 7 in Harford, and 71 / 8 in Howard County! Call 410-453-9500 or the stations for days and times!



INTERESTING READING

The Unsteady March: The Rise and Decline of Racial Equality in America. Philip A. Klinker & Rogers M. Smith. Chicago: University of Chicago, 1999. 417 pp. $32.50. The authors demonstrate that America's progress toward racial equality has been very episodic, with stagnation and retrenchment always following any periods of advance. Substantial progress only occurs during large wars, a strong enemy requiring massive mobilization, and when there are powerful domestic political organizations able to pressure leaders to follow through on their rhetoric. Well worth reading.

A People's History of the Supreme Court. Peter Irons. New York: Penguin, 1999. 542 pp. $15.95 pbk. Newly published in paperback, this stellar history of the highest court traces its fitful, contradictory history. Irons, writing in the Howard Zinn tradition, examines the critical rulings in slavery, racial segregation, free speech, and abortion - and how the Court has occasionally risen above partisan politics.



The Civil Rights Movement: A Photographic History, 1954-1968. Steven Kasher & Myrlie Evers-Williams. 256 pp. September, 2000. $27.50. Anyone interested in the movement should examine this book's riveting and disturbing images. Page by page, the history comes alive in the many forceful pictures. The text is also excellent.

The Autobiography of Martin Luther King, Jr. Clayborne Carson, editor. January, 2001. 416 pp. $15.95 pbk. Stanford University historian Carson assembled this fascinating book with the King family's approval. Included are King's books, articles, essays, personal letters, and unpublished manuscripts.

Freedom's Children: Young Civil Rights Activists Tell Their Own Stories. Ellen Levine. December, 2000. 192 pp. $6.99. Illuminating, excellent stories - at a reading level of aged 9-12 - of children and teenagers who contributed to the civil rights movement. Some interesting uncovered facts arise. For example, did you know that high school junior Claudette Colvin had been arrested for refusing to give her bus seat to a white man on a city bus - months earlier than Rosa Parks?

Testimonio: A Documentary History of the Mexican-American Struggle for Civil Rights. Francisco A. Rosales, editor. November, 2000. $22.95. Compilation of articles about the unfinished struggle in the USA for civil rights for Hispanics.



REST IN PEACE

Erica M. Dibietz, Disability Advocate, 72. Dibietz was a strong local advocate for the mentally ill, serving as a social worker, psychiatric hospital administrator, and state officer. She successfully helped many families obtain better services for "dually-diagnosed" patients, a term Dibietz herself coined. (Baltimore Sun, December 29, 2000:5B)

Julian C. Dixon, Congressman, 66. While representing his west Los Angeles district for 22 years, Dixon was a strong advocate of civil rights causes. He chaired the Congressional Black Caucus, fought for legislation establishing a Washington memorial to the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and worked for Washington's local funding on the D. C. Appropriations Committee. (CNN Internet, December 11, 2000)

Henry B. Gonzalez, Congressman, 84. The first Mexican-American elected to the Texas Senate and a tireless champion of the underdog, Gonzalez was chair of the House Banking Committee and served in the House for 37 years. He fought for affordable housing and helped expose the savings & loan industry's excesses. Former HUD Secretary Henry Cisneros said "So many hearts were touched, so many dreams were forged because of Henry Gonzalez." (Baltimore Sun, December 3, 2000:9A)

Hosea Williams, Civil Rights Advocate, 74. Inspired by Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., Williams and John Lewis organized the "Bloody Sunday" march in Selma, Alabama, that left 80 people injured and lead to the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. He was King's powerful advance man for much of the civil rights struggle. Williams also served as a national exec for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, a Georgia state representative, an Atlanta councilman and a county commissioner. (CNN Internet Nov. 16, 2000)


CONTACT US:

    Greater Baltimore Community Housing Resource Board, Inc.
    P. O. Box 66180
    Baltimore, Maryland 21239-6180
    410-453-9500

    mail@gbchrb.org        

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